Chance the Rapper and the "Saturday Night Live" crew just asked Barack Obama to return to office with a hilarious '90s ballad.

Chance the Rapper debuted a new song for Thanksgiving during his opening monologue on "Saturday Night Live," and it's a tune we all can sing along to at this point.

The 24-year-old rapper told the audience that he is pledging $1 million to Chicago public schools for Thanksgiving, but he doesn’t have the money so he is planning to earn the bucks with a holiday song.

In one of the episode’s standout sketches, he starred in a music video styled like a cross between Boyz II Men and New Edition, and pleaded for former U.S. President Barack Obama to come back. Joined by Kenan Thompson and Chris Redd, the Boyz-II-Men-style song about how much they are missing the 44th president almost one year into 45’s first term. He kicked off the night with an original Thanksgiving song for his monologue.

Turning his opening monologue into a mini-performance, Chance started with the lyrics: “It’s Thanksgiving time, the one day a year/where you invite the folks that you normally fear. It’s Thanksgiving time when you are forced to see/every single bad apple on your whole family tree.”

And it only got better from there. Later in the episode, during an R&B style music video, cast members Kenan Thompson and Chris Redd joined Chance for a performance asking Barack Obama to come back.

 

"Every night I turn the TV on and cry, and I cry, and I cry, I say why, I feel like we're all gonna die," the three sing.

"I'm in hell, dreaming about you and Michelle," the song continues.

“We didn't know just what we had,” the chorus went. “Now things are looking bad. Like really bad, like World War bad, like nuclear bad.”

As Chance added, “When I think of change, the only change I want is you!”

This isn't the first time Chance has crooned about Obama on SNL. A year ago, as SNL's musical guest, Chance the Rapper sang the Run-DMC parody “Jingle Barack” about President Obama’s last Christmas in the White House. 

Banner/Thumbnail : Rosalind O'Connor/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

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