Mind Blowing Behind-The-Scenes Photos From Hollywood’s Best Horror Movies

Sameera Ehteram
Watch the people who scare us the most onscreen turn into their movie monsters.

Hollywood makeup and sci-fi effects have the capability to blow our socks off. They may scare us out of our wits on screen but seeing them while they are being turned into monsters, aka in the process of being ‘made up,’ really give us a whole new perspective.

Castle Freak

Directed by Stuart Gordon and inspired from the short story "The Outsider" by H. P. Lovecraft, "Castle Freak" was released direct to video in 1995. The story is of a troubled couple and their blind daughter visiting a 12th century castle they've inherited in Italy, only to find it haunted. It received mixed reviews from critics, although many have praised its disturbing feel and tight storyline. It currently holds a 57 percent approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

Total Recall

This science fiction action film directed by Paul Verhoeven starred Arnold Schwarzenegger, Rachel Ticotin, Sharon Stone, Michael Ironside and Ronny Cox, and was loosely based on the Philip K. Dick story "We Can Remember It for You Wholesale." It won a Special Achievement Academy Award for its visual effects.

Child’s Play

"Child's Play," also known as Chucky, is a horror film franchise created by Don Mancini that consists of six slasher films, starring Academy Award nominee Brad Dourif.

Chucky, the doll possessed by a serial killer, discovers the perfect mate to kill and revive into the body of another doll. The film has had five sequels and has gone into other media, such as comic books.

The Fly

Directed and co-written by David Cronenberg, the film starred Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis and John Getz, and was based loosely on George Langelaan's 1957 short story of the same name. The make-up effects created by Chris Walas and Stephan Dupuis won the Academy Award for Best Makeup.

The House II

"House II: The Second Story" was a 1987 comedy horror film and sequel to the 1986 film "House." The story revolves around the  new owner of a sinister house who gets involved with reanimated corpses and demons searching for an ancient Aztec skull with magic powers. It received negative reviews from critics, receiving a 0 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

The Thing

"The Thing," directed by John Carpenter, written by Bill Lancaster and starring Kurt Russell, revolves around the film's primary antagonist, aptly named The Thing: a parasitic extraterrestrial life form that assimilates other organisms and in turn imitates them.

The Terminator

The 1984 science fiction action film starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Michael Biehn, Linda Hamilton and Paul Winfield had Schwarzenegger playing the Terminator, a cyborg assassin sent back in time from the year 2029 to 1984 to kill Sarah Connor, played by Hamilton.

The movie was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the American National Film Registry, being deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant."

The Ring

"The Ring" is a story of a young journalist investigating a mysterious videotape which seems to cause the death of anyone in a week of viewing it. The 2002 psychological horror had Naomi Watts, Daveigh Chase and Martin Henderson in the cast and was a remake of the 1998 Japanese horror film "Ringu."


"Alien" is a 1979 science-fiction horror film about a highly aggressive extraterrestrial creature that stalked and killed the crew of a spaceship. It received both critical acclaim and box office success, receiving an Academy Award for Best Visual Effects, Saturn Awards for Best Science Fiction Film, Best Direction, Best Supporting Actress and a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation.

Nightmare on Elm Street 3: The Dream Warriors

The 1987 slasher fantasy film and the third film in the Nightmare on Elm Street series had survivors of undead serial killer Freddy Krueger, who stalked his victims.

The film grossed $8.9 million, debuted at No. 1 during its opening weekend and was the highest grossing film for the studio that year and the 24th highest grossing film of 1987.