Jodie Foster's Moving Coming Out Speech At The Golden Globes

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Jodie Foster received the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement at the Golden Globes for her "outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment," and the speech she gave afterwards was moving and open and may well be remembered for many, many years to come.

Jodie Foster

Jodie Foster received the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement at the Golden Globes for her "outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment," and the speech she gave afterwards was moving and open and may well be remembered for many, many years to come.

Though she said it wasn't a "coming out" speech, it actually was. But it was a very smart, moving and beautiful one, done with extreme class.

“So when I'm here being all confessional, I guess I just have a sudden urge to say something that I've never really been able to air in public. So, a declaration… that I'm a little nervous about, but maybe not quite as nervous as my publicist right now, huh Jennifer? But you know, I'm just gonna put it out there, right? Loud and proud, right? So I'm gonna need your support on this. I am… single. Yes I am, I am single. No, I'm kidding. But I mean, I'm not really kidding, but I'm kind of kidding. Thank you for the enthusiasm. Can I get a wolf whistle or something? I hope you guys weren't hoping this would be a big coming out speech tonight, because I already did my coming out about a thousand years ago, back in the stone age. In those very quaint days when a fragile young girl would open up to trusted friends and family, co-workers, and then gradually, proudly to everyone who knew her, to everyone she actually met. But now apparently, I'm told that every celebrity is expected to honor the details of their private life with a press conference, a fragrance, and a prime time reality show,” she said.  

In her acceptance speech, she not only very subtly, yet openly talked about her sexual orientation but her plans for the future as well, saying, “This feels like the end of one era and the beginning of something else. Scary and exciting, and now what? Well, I'm never going to be up on this stage again. On any stage, for that matter. Change, you've gotta love it. I will continue to tell stories, to move people by being moved: the greatest job in the world. It's just that from now on, I may be holding a different talking stick.

And maybe it won't be as sparkly. Maybe it won't open on three thousand screens. Maybe it will be so quiet and delicate that only dogs can hear it whistle. But it will be my writing on the wall: Jodie Foster was here, I still am, and I want to be seen, to be understood, deeply, and to be not so very lonely. Thank you, all of you, for the company. Here's to the next fifty years.”

Her speech gave rise to murmurs of retiring from movies which she dismissed later saying, “Oh that’s so funny, you couldn’t drag me away. And I’d like to be directing tomorrow.”

Here’s what the people think of her coming out:

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