Philip Seymour Hoffman Thought He Was Talking About Happiness. He Was Actually Talking About Being An Addict.

Lauren Burgoon
In the context of his fatal heroin overdose, hearing Philip Seymour Hoffman struggle with the idea of happiness is heartbreaking.

It's always eerie when you hear a voice from beyond the grave, but there is something particularly disturbing and tragic about a new animated short starring Philip Seymour Hoffman. 

Hoffman, hailed as one of the most talented and versatile actors of his generation, died unexpectedly in February of a heroin overdose. After, friends and coworkers remembered how tortured Hoffman could be as he kept chasing an elusive high and satisfaction.

In a new PBS video, "Blank on Blank," Hoffman's struggle is as evident as it is heartbreaking as he talks about happiness. 

"I think I kill pleasure," he says in a staccato, rushed voice. "Like, I take too much of it and therefore make it unpleasurable. ... There is no pleasure that I haven't actually made myself sick on."

Recorded in December 2012, Hoffman talks about his three children and the difficulty of knowing the exact moment when he's experiencing happiness. In context, his words are haunting.

"I think I'm happy," he says. "But there are moments when something else creeps in there."