Rush Crosses The Line As A True Winner

Being an avid Formula One fan, I walked into Ron Howard’s Rush with low expectations. How accurately could Hollywood reproduce the story one of the greatest rivalries and most heroic comebacks in the history of a sport that America knows so little about, I thought? However, by the time I walked out of the theatre, I couldn’t help but think that it was one of the best works of cinema I had ever seen.

Being an avid Formula One fan, I walked into Ron Howard’s Rush with low expectations. How accurately could Hollywood reproduce the story one of the greatest rivalries and most heroic comebacks in the history of a sport that America knows so little about, I thought? However, by the time I walked out of the theatre, I couldn’t help but think that it was one of the best works of cinema I had ever seen.
 
By Howard’s own admission, Rush would have been a difficult movie to make had it not been a true story.
 
Based on the 1976 F1 season, Rush tells the story of the intense rivalry between flamboyant British driver James Hunt and the almost robotic Austrian Niki Lauda. Poles apart as characters, the one thing that both men shared was an insatiable will to win. Set in a time when the sport had at least one fatal accident every season, the film does well to capture the uncertainty among the drivers of the era, who had to suppress their fear and drive at breakneck speeds, risking life and limb.
 
While the women in the theatre swooned like little schoolgirls the moment Chris Hemsworth made his appearance, what stood out for me was his spot on portrayal of James Hunt, not the easiest of characters to play.  Hemsworth did well to capture the essence of Hunt’s character, which was that of a playboy who lived life on the edge. However, the performance that stole the show was that of Daniel Bruhl, who played Niki Lauda. In fact, his performance was so accurate that it was difficult to tell the real Niki and the reel Niki apart.
 
Olivia Wilde and Alexandra Maria Lara also put in solid performances as Suzi Hunt and Marlene Lauda, the love interests of the two lead characters.
 
Ron Howards’s attention to detail and sharp story telling skills ensured that Rush never had a dull moment. The film makes the transition from light-hearted fun to intense rivalry to tragedy to triumph of the human spirit with consummate ease.
 
Comparing Rush to another Hollywood racing flick would be unfair as it is head and shoulders above the rest. Rush is a must watch for moviegoers; whether Formula One fans or not. The cinematography is stunning, the racing scenes precise and intense, and the more said about the acting, the better.  
 
Watch the trailer above
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