The Guardian's Website Has Button To Turn Off Royal Baby Coverage. Why Don't We Have That For Celebs, Period?

English newspaper The Guardian has a button on its site to filter coverage of the birth of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's child.

People awaiting the birth of the child of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

You are probably annoyed at this already.  Don't worry, the Guardian has you covered. (Source:  Reuters)

As has been reported in the news by now, Catherine Middleton, now known as the Duchess of Cambridge and wife to Prince William of England, has been admitted to a London hospital to give birth to their child, who will likely in 50 or 60 years become the King or Queen of England (assuming the monarchy survives that long).  Given the tabloid nature and spectacle that the Royal Family has entrenched itself, every news media outlet worth its weight in ad revenue have sent in their crews to cover this supposedly historical event, or at least written on it (except Al-Jazeera, but that is because it is a sensible organization).  Now, there are many people who probably care little of the happenings of an aristocratic family, but for the media, they are irrelevant.

Except for the Guardian.  The somewhat leftist English newspaper has gone out of its way to cater to that silent majority of people who would be happy if they only thing they heard or see about the birth of the "royal baby" is a 100-word piece or 15-second audio or video clip.  On the Guardian website, the option exists for users to filter out Royal Family content clicking on a button on the website.  It is conveniently located on the top right part of the front page, where it asks, "Not A Royalist?'  From there, all mentions of babies, Middletons, and Royal Families are filtered out, making the Guardian resemble itself on a normal news day.  Readers who would rather light themselves on fire than drag themselves through the empty nether world of celebrity coverage now get the ability to read their news normally.

This is a great idea, but one that is likely to be only temporary.  Why not step it up, and make that button permanent?  Perhaps we can even take this a bit further here:  There can be a button on the website of your favorite news site where you can remove any references to, say, whenever Kanye West opens his mouth or some teen pop star gets in trouble.  You can even make an app for filtering this kind of celebrity drama, if need be.  That the tech world has not thought of this already boggles the mind.  Consider this a freebie.