Autistic Teen Donates Toys, Crayons And Books To Children With Cancer

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“The fact that he was feeling compassion toward other people is huge because that’s not something that autistic kids have – that’s really hard for them to do.”

Autistic Teen

A 15-year-old autistic teen is teaching the world nothing can hold you back from being kind.

Carter Crockett, a first year student at Millville High School near Philadelphia, started collecting crayons, books and toys a year ago.

However, he wasn’t collecting these for himself; he was doing it to help other children.

This incredible idea of donating to children who were in need came to Crockett’s mind last year while having dinner at a restaurant.  He asked his mom, Patti Crockett, about an annual fundraiser that takes place at the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. 

"He asked me what St. Jude was because they were doing their annual fundraiser, and I explained what St. Jude was and what they were doing and that's how it all started," explained Crockett’s mother.

Once Crockett learned the hospital primarily treated children with cancer for free, he decided to make a plea on Facebook. He wanted to bring color back in the lives of these children, suffering from cancer and away from their home and family.

 

"I’m putting my autism on the side so I can help them," he said in the plea. 

The now viral video of Crockett’s plea caught the attention of the very same restaurant where the idea was initiated, reported as Chili’s, which donated t-shirts, gift cards, Play Doh, hats and other items to fulfill Crockett’s cause.

The teenager, his mother and two of his friends loaded all the goodies, including 15,000 crayons and 1,500 coloring books, in a camper van and took a road trip to deliver them personally at the hospital. Once they reached the destination, St. Jude staffers warmly welcomed Crockett and commended his act of kindness.

“The fact that he was feeling compassion toward other people is huge because that’s not something that autistic kids have – that’s really hard for them to do,” Crockett’s mother told Fox 29. “I feel truly blessed that he did this. He did this all on his own.” 

And while there is a lot of negativity in the world, this story of a teenager, who also suffers from autism, thinking about others who are in pain, should be enough to restore our faith in humanity.

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