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Pakistani Band Beygairat Brigade Strikes A Chord With The Public


In typical Pakistani fashion, the band’s name is a mixture of English and Urdu – or more appropriately as it is termed Urdish. Beygairat Brigade is an outfit based in Lahore, the first word translates basically as shameless.

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In typical Pakistani fashion, the band’s name is a mixture of English and Urdu – or more appropriately as it is termed Urdish. Beygairat Brigade is an outfit based in Lahore, the first word translates basically as shameless.

The group’s claim to fame will be their first song Aalu Anday (potatoes and eggs), probably because of notoriety. The lyrics take a punch at basically everything that is wrong with Pakistan’s set-up. From the prices of staple food to current political parties, the powerful army and the country’s revered and now feared ISI – the band leaves not one stone unturned as it goes along its merry satirical way.

The guys don’t even spare the public, divided over the opinion of Malik Mumtaz Qadri – the security guard who shot down Salmaan Taseer, governor of Punjab province, in cold blood for his outspoken stance on the blasphemy law which he alleged was used to target minorities. Qadri is now revered in some circles for gunning down the man who put down the Pakistani law of the death penalty for speaking against the last Prophet of God, Muhammad – who is revered by Muslims.  

The song takes a hit at Pakistan’s Army Chief Ashfaq Kayani, and how the unprecedented extension of his term has shut his mouth along with placards that point out who cares about Blackwater (thought to be a US mercenary firm based in Pakistan), when attacks are planned and executed by insiders.

The song is a viral hit in the country, where deep seated paranoia of the masses wants to put all blame for mishaps on Zionist activities (a placard screams out: This video is sponsored by Zionists) with no internal check and balance system in place.

Beygairat Brigade’s band members comprise of Daniyal Malik, an economist by profession, 15-year-old Hamza Malik, who is in the ninth grade and Ali Aftaab Saeed, who works as a director at a local news channel.

The song is a breath of fresh air with all the political rhetoric with translated lyrics, posted below.


Carbonated.TV
2011-10-21 00:23:55.0

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