100,000 Uzbek Refugees Flee Southern Kyrgyzstan , Seek Safety At Border

JALAL-KUDUK, Uzbekistan — Standing behind barbed wire with other Uzbek refugees, the woman tearfully raised her hands in a Muslim prayer for her dead husband. She had left his body at their burned-down house in southern Kyrgyzstan while fleeing ethnic riots that reduced much of a major city to ruins. "He's lying there unburied," lamented the woman, who identified herself only as Khadicha, a doctor in her 50s, as she waited Monday in a no-man's land to cross into Uzbekistan. She is among tens of thousands of minority Uzbeks who have fled the deadliest violence Kyrgyzstan has seen since the two ethnic groups fought over land 20 years ago as Moscow lost its grip on the former Soviet republic in Central Asia. Uzbekistan hastily set up camps to handle the flood of refugees, most of them women, children and the elderly. They were hungry and frightened, with accounts of Uzbek girls being raped and Kyrgyz snipers shooting at them as they rushed to the border.