16 Year-Old Who Died On 1st Solo Drive May Have Been Texting

by
Owen Poindexter
A 16 year-old girl named Savannah Nash died on one of her first solo driving trips, and she may have been texting at the time of the crash.


Savannah Nash, 16, died on one of her first solo drives, while texting. PHOTO: Facebook

A 16 year-old girl named Savannah Nash died on one of her first solo driving trips, and she may have been texting at the time of the crash. Nash, who was from Harrisonville, MO, was trying to turn left onto Highway 7, when she turned into the path of a truck. The truck slammed on its brakes, but couldn't stop in time to save Nash. Police said that a long, unfinished text was found on Nash's phone.

Savannah Nash was nearing the end of her freshman year of high school. She turned 16 on May 8th, and received her full driver's license on Wednesday, the day before her death. A facebook page was established to commemorate Nash, and mourning friends and family have covered the page with their condolences, expressions of sadness and Bible verses.

"Today, it's truly starting to sink in, that Savannah will no longer be at her locker when we all walk by, she won't be in any of her classes to talk and laugh with us, But God Called her back for a reason, Sometimes the best one's leave early so they don't have to deal with the hardships of life. Savannah's Watching over all of us. R.I.P."

Texting while driving is an issue that isn't going away. It's very hard to enforce, very hard to resist, and has nowhere close to the stigma of drunk driving. You never here someone saying, "hey buddy, finish that text before you get behind the wheel." It's a little depressing about what this implies about our self control (and sense of invincibility), but the solution to texting and driving may be to take driving out of the equation. Yes, you should always offer to text for a driver if they are threatening to, but I'm talking about self-driving cars. One hopeful consequence of that major shift is that it may save the lives of people who can't extract themselves from their phones to fully concentrate on navigating a heavy metal box at speeds that surpass any land mammal.

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