5 Important Facts To Know About The Violent Protests In Brazil

by
Fatimah Mazhar
People are out on the streets in Brazil, the country where the 20th FIFA World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics are scheduled to take place. The first protests against the government began on June 6th over the transportation price hikes which escalated into violent riots and clashes between the police and the people.

Riots In Brazil

People are out on the streets in Brazil, the country where the 20th FIFA World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics are scheduled to take place. The first protests against the government began on June 6th over the transportation price hikes which escalated into violent riots and clashes between the police and the people.

But it’s not just that. The demonstrations are not just about, what some people might call, a petty issue such as the rising costs of public transportation but they are also the expression of pent up frustrations regarding the plutocratic regime. In fact, the hike in bus fares is itself a serious issue for Brazilians and only intensified when they were not heard.

Below are some important facts to know about the protests in Brazil:

The Free Fare Movement And Why It Matters:

Riots In Brazil

The protests against the government in Brazil are also known as The Free Fare Movement. According to a blog (named after the movement), Brazilians have been ‘fighting for improvements’ in the transportation system ‘for years.’ This means the disagreement has been there for long and what’s happening in Sao Paulo and in many other cities now, is the result of the ignorance shown by the authorities.

The blog also states, “An estimated 37 million Brazilians have been excluded from the public transportation system because they cannot afford it. This number, not an updated figure, does not come out of nowhere: from 20 cent to 20 cent raise, transportation has become, according to IBGE (Brazilian Institute for Geography and Statistics), the third largest expense for the Brazilian family, taking the right to mobility from the population.”

Disparity In Brazil And Plutocracy:

Riots In Brazil

Sure the anti-government movement has sprung from the transportation hike but it has also brought to light some very important issues surrounding the Brazilian people. Income disparity among the population is one big problem and the price hike will only make things worse for the already impoverished public.

Also, the government is allegedly spending more on football stadiums rather than focusing on the needs and wants of the common man in Brazil. One Twitter user called the Brazilian government as ‘plutocrats ransacking the country’ before Summer Olympics 2016.

State Media Ignorance And Police Brutality:

Riots In Brazil

As it often happens during anti-regime protests, the state media of Brazil is allegedly not providing proper coverage of the riots and incidents of police brutality. Brazilian protesters on the internet, especially on social media websites and blogs are trying to convey their experiences of the demonstrations through photos.

Riots In Brazil

The activists are also requesting the use of hashtag #ChangeBrazil  on Twitter to help spread the message of the demonstrators. The video below explains a lot about the rioting in the country:

No World Cup Next Year?

Riots In Brazil

Following the ongoing protests in Sao Paulo and other cities of Brazil, demonstrations took place outside Maracana Stadium, Rio de Janeiro. During the soccer match between Mexico and Italy for the Confederations Cup, riot police used teargas and rubber bullets to confront protesters angry over the amount of public money being spent on staging the event and next year's World Cup. The posters read, "Dear rulers, where is the respect and fair play?"

Riots In Brazil

This event at the football stadium was followed by news and picture shares on social networking sites  that citizens of Brazil are requesting the world to not to attend the World Cup next year.

It’s appalling to see how a disagreement on fare hikes and football matches can affect the peace of a country. But that’s just because the authorities never really pay attention to what the public wants. The demonstrations are growing violent with time as the Brazilian government has not yet responded to their requests and demands. For updates on the Free Fare Movement stay connected to our website.

LOOK: Brazil Protests In Photos

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