Has the 9/11 Mastermind Become A Peace-Loving Saint?

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editors
The suspected mastermind of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Khalid Sheikh Mohammad, has said that the holy book of the Muslims – The Quran – forbids violence to spread Islam.

The suspected mastermind of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Khalid Sheikh Mohammad, has said that the holy book of the Muslims – The Quran – forbids violence to spread Islam.

His tone seems to have changed considerably from his past ramblings of waging Jihad against the United States and other Western powers, leaving people scratching their heads.

He wrote that the Quran “forbids us to use force as a means of converting" and "truth and reality never comes by muscles and force but by using the mind and wisdom".

Mohammad, who is about to turn 50, has spent the last 10 years in US custody. His 36-page document, titled “The Road To Real Happiness” comes a year-and-a-half into the pretrial phase of a military commission’s proceedings against him.

In the writings, he addresses the military judge, court officials, prosecutors and defense lawyers. Mohammed said that the time spent at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where he had been since 2006, three years after his capture, had not been wasted. “I have been with the Only One True God. I am very happy in my cell because my spirit is free even while my body is being held captive."

He asked that the writings be delivered to the court officials, who he invited to embrace the one true faith – Islam.

Although he has softened his stance on violence against the West, the key Al-Qaeda member still manages to take a jibe at the ‘decay’ in American society. He mocked US soldiers in Iraq for having fun on their Playstations, while Muslim families struggled for food and shelter. 

Mohammed said that despite the hardships brought upon them by allied forces, Muslims in war torn countries like Iraq and Afghanistan were happier than any American soldier could be.

“At the end the American soldiers go back home and commit suicide but the poor man, still with his dry bread and black tea, lives with his poor wife in their humble muddy house but with happy hearts and souls," he writes.

There will be two more parts to these writings in which he will attempt to defend the attacks of 9/11 and dispute the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan.

So has the one of the most feared terrorists in the world become a peace-loving soul all of a sudden or is this a shrewd ploy to soften the military court. Try as he might, it is doubtful that the court or anyone in the US for that matter will forgive his crimes.

Carbonated.TV