Why Are So Many People Fleeing Africa Despite Economic Growth?

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On Monday alone, around 600 Africans tried to cross a 20-foot fence between Morocco and the Spanish enclave of Ceuta.

The African continent's economy has considerably improved over the past decade. In fact, in 2013, its economy grew faster than any other continent, according to the African Development Bank (AfDB).

While sub-Saharan Africa’s economic growth dropped to 1.6 percent, its lowest level in two decades, last year, Richard Attias, branding specialist and former producer of the World Economic Forum in Davos, said, “2017 will be the year of the African product label.”

Despite relatively better economic conditions, core issues on the continent, such as oppressive regimes, corruption and civil wars, have persisted, leading thousands to risk their lives to reach Europe in search of a better life.

Case in point: In 2015, nearly 40,000 migrants fled Eritrea, where human rights are viewed as among the worst in the world.

On Monday alone, around 600 Africans tried to cross a 20-foot fence between Morocco and the Spanish enclave of Ceuta.

Eleven migrants were reportedly injured while attempting to cross the barbed-wire border and have been hospitalized.

While most migrants crossing the two borders between Africa and the European Union are turned back, the ones who manage to jump the fence are mostly placed in immigration centers.

So, essentially, their struggle for a better life in Europe usually ends in despair because they are not allowed to live Europe.

The New York Times reports there are now more than 1,400 migrants at a Ceuta immigration center and most of them will be sent back to Morocco or to their countries of origin.

Carbonated.TV
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