After Global Espionage, Is The Outrage Towards China And Russia Justified?

by
Fatimah Mazhar
Apparently the Obama administration, including the president himself, is not happy with China, Russia, Hong Kong and Ecuador for supporting National Security leaker Edward J. Snowden.

China, Russia, U.S. And Snowden

Apparently the Obama administration, including the president himself, is not happy with China, Russia, Hong Kong and Ecuador for supporting National Security leaker Edward J. Snowden.

The ex-CIA agent is responsible for leaking some of the most controversial and classified U.S. intelligence documents which have unveiled a massive global U.S. espionage system.

Following Snowden’s escape to Hong Kong, news reports of his flight to Moscow are emerging though none of them has been authenticated. Given the fact that Russia seemed most interested in providing a political asylum to Snowden, chances are the whistleblower accepted the offer and is now hiding in Moscow.

The damage the former NSA contractor has done to the Obama administration is going to have an everlasting impact on Obama’s government; there is no doubt about that. Since the damage is great, the fury of the damaged party is equally great and they are going to get their hands on Snowden no matter what. Not even the White House petition could stop the whistleblower from being charged under the Espionage Act.

Amid the chaos, people from the Obama administration such as John Kerry and Press Secretary Jay Carney delivered some of the most scathing statements regarding the countries, mainly China and Russia, which were trying to imply that Snowden was a hero. Kerry said, “I wonder if Mr. Snowden chose China and Russia as assistants in his flight from justice because they’re such powerful bastions of Internet freedom.” Carney expressed his ‘frustration and disappointment’ with China and Hong Kong saying that ‘the [Obama] administration didn’t buy the suggestion that China could not have taken action.’

But are they justified in saying so? The leaked documents, which according to the Obama administration are classified (and authentic) documents, revealed that the U.S. intelligence agencies had been spying on various countries including Russia and China. How can Kerry mock these two countries for internet freedom when the U.S. intelligence had been hacking their diplomats in the past? And what about the frustration and disappointment of the countries snooped on by the U.S.?

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