Arab Spring: Egypt Revolutionized Or Not?

by
staff
The uprising in Egypt started off from January 25, 2011. Following a series of events in the Arab region where years old tyrant dictatorships were being overthrown by pro-democracy supporters. The events are also referred to as the ‘Egyptian Revolution of 2011’, though Egypt remains without any change or visible revolution to date.

Arab Spring: Egypt Revolutionized Or Not?

Image: Reuters

The uprising in Egypt started off from January 25, 2011. Following a series of events in the Arab region where years old tyrant dictatorships were being overthrown by pro-democracy supporters. The events are also referred to as the ‘Egyptian Revolution of 2011’, though Egypt remains without any change or visible revolution to date.

Even after getting rid of the tyrant leadership of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt craves for true democracy on the second anniversary of the Arab Spring. According to reports, Egyptian President Muhamed Mursi declared a month long state of emergency following a long weekend of violence during which many people got killed and thousands injured in demonstrations.

Yet again, Egypt is in need of change to oust Mursi, who is the new Pharaoh of the country. ‘Down down Mursi! Down down the regime that tortured us and killed us!’ shouted people in Port Said as the coffins of the people who lost their lives during the protests were being carried through the streets.

Arab Spring: Egypt Revolutionized Or Not?

Image: Reuters

A somewhat similar situation of tyranny has again emerged under Muhamed Mursi that was experienced by the Egyptians at the hands of Mobarak as many promises remain unfulfilled and the population divided.

The beacon of hope, that was lit in those eighteen days at Tahrir Square and that ignited the Middle East with a flame of revolution, is now getting dimmer. The population has become polarized with liberals, leftists and secularists on one side and the president, the Muslim Brotherhood and a government dominated by extremist Islamic groups on the other.

Arab Spring: Egypt Revolutionized Or Not?

Image: Reuters

Though Mursi and his government have been trying hard to highlight the positives of the regime which include the ending of a military rule and elections of Egypt’s first civilian president, much of the population is still convinced that the reign of power is still in the hands of the Muslim Brotherhood.

All that frustration and violent demonstrations are coming back home to Egypt.

Just last month protesters gathered around the presidential palace after Mohamed Mursi had granted himself absolute powers beyond the judicial control.  He was supported by Islamist groups which detained about fifty demonstrators including several minors, bound them by hands and beat them up for confessions with respect to possible rebellion against Mursi’s rule.

The Muslim Brotherhood is notorious for its strict Islamic ideologies. It is one of the largest Islamic movements and the most influential in the Arab world. There is a speculation that this is an extremist Islamic terrorist group which is allegedly linked to al-Qaeda and was also responsible for sexual assault and abuse with women in Tahrir Square since Feb 2011.

The Egyptians feel as if they have been fooled. They were promised a democratic system but now face a familiar autocratic rule only this time peppered with strict Islamic Shariah. With Islamic militants gaining strength in many parts of Africa such as Mali, Algeria, Libya and Syria, the militant insurgency is feared by Egyptians as well.

With continuing violence and protests which began around Friday, the Egyptian Revolution dream remains incomplete with riot police firing tear gas at rock-throwing protesters in Central Cairo on Monday. 

Carbonated.TV