Private Prisons Will Make Even More Money, Thanks To Jeff Sessions

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“[Obama’s directive] changed long-standing policy and practice, and impaired the Bureau’s ability to meet the future needs of the federal correctional system.”

It seems U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is having way too much fun rolling back former President Barack Obama’s regulations on human rights.

A day after he rescinded the bathroom bill that protected transgender students, Sessions reversed a memo that placed guidance meant to reduce and ultimately phase out the use of private prisons.

In a memo to the acting head of Bureau of Prisons, the attorney general wrote that Obama’s directive “changed long-standing policy and practice, and impaired the Bureau’s ability to meet the future needs of the federal correctional system.”

“Therefore, I direct the Bureau to return to its previous approach,” Sessions wrote. 

 

“This will restore BOP's flexibility to manage the federal prison inmate population based on capacity needs," a Justice Department spokesperson said in a statement.

The federal Bureau of Prisons currently holds 12 private prison contracts, which house nearly 21,000 inmates across the country. But now it seems, under Sessions’ new memo, the number is likely to rise much higher.

Additionally, in light of President Donald Trump’s harsh immigration policies, which directs Customs and Border Protection and immigration and Custom Enforcement to track, detain and deport undocumented immigrants, it seems private prison companies will soon be racking up huge profits — and that’s bad news.

To understand why, take a look at the video above.

Read More: Private Prison Company Lets Mass Killings Break Out In Prisons
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