This Volcano In Iceland Can Shut Down Much Of Europe’s Air Space, Again

by
editors
September 02, 2014: Brace yourself for a massive shutdown.

Iceland's largest volcanic system has been hit by thousands of earthquakes over the past two weeks and scientists have been on high alert.

Remember an ash cloud from Iceland that closed much of Europe's air space for six days in 2010?

Well, it could happen again – this time from a different volcano – according to latest news reports from the region.

“Iceland's largest volcanic system - 118 miles long and up to 15.5 miles wide- has been hit by thousands of earthquakes over the last two weeks, putting scientists have been on high alert,” Reuters reported.

While four years ago, the ash came from Eyjafjallajökull – one of the smaller ice caps of Iceland – this time around it is Bardarbunga – also the second highest mountain in Iceland – which could cause the problem.

On August 23, Aviation Color Codes were raised from orange to red, – which is the highest level on a five-color scale – by the Geological Survey (USGS), indicating an eruption could be in progress.

"The fissure eruption is continuing at a stable level," Iceland's Meteorological Office said in a statement. "No explosive activity is observed, the eruption remains an effusive lava eruption."

TIME Magazine interviewed Ragnar Th. Sigurdsson, who has been photographing volcanoes in Iceland for four decades.

According to the photographer, based near the Icelandic capital, Reykjavík, “no one lives at this barren location, but heavy seismic activity to the north has led to closed roads and the evacuation of tourists.”

Have a look at some of the most incredible images of the Bardarbunga volcano system below:

Iceland PHOTOS

Steam and smoke rise over a half mile long fissure in a lava field north of the Vatnajokull glacier, which covers part of Bardarbunga volcano system.

Iceland PHOTOS

The lava flows on the ground after the volcano erupted again.

 

 

Iceland PHOTOS

Warning signs block the road to Bardarbunga volcano, some 12.5 miles away, in the north-west region of the Vatnajokull glacier.

Iceland PHOTOS

Lava fountains are pictured at the site of a fissure eruption near the volcano.

Carbonated.TV