Blogger Released From Egyptian Jail After Four Years

Finally Adbel Kareem Nabil – Kareem Amer is released from his four years at an Egyptian prison. His crime was nothing more than writing on his blog and being vocal and critical of the conservative Muslims. He accused his school, Cario’s Al-Azhar University for promoting extremist ideas.

Finally Adbel Kareem Nabil – Kareem Amer is released from his four years at an Egyptian prison. His crime was nothing more than writing on his blog and being vocal and critical of the conservative Muslims. He accused his school, Cario’s Al-Azhar University for promoting extremist ideas.

The idea of a student calling  on the university for promoting extremism and hard-line school of Islamic thought, as well as calling the longest ever President Hosni Mubarak, a dictator didn’t sit too well with the authority. Amer was arrested and imprisoned in November 2006.

Amer has always held that he was jailed because he ‘expressed’ his opinion and in doing so, challenged the tradition. He is said to have been beaten by the police pre his release who told him to not blog again.

Abdel Kareem Nabil, known by his pen name, Kareem Amer, was released November 16.


A blogger who endured a four-year stint in an Egyptian prison for his writings has been released, saying he was jailed for defying convention.

Abdel Kareem Nabil -- known by his blogger name, Kareem Amer -- is a self-proclaimed secularist who was convicted and imprisoned by Egypt for ""spreading information disruptive of public order and damaging to the country's reputation,"" ""incitement to hate Islam"" and ""defaming the president of the republic,"" according to a statement from the Committee to Protect Journalists.

The former law student at Cairo's Al-Azhar University is a critic of conservative Muslims and has accused his school of promoting extremist ideas, calling Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak a ""dictator,"" it said.

Nabil was released from prison November 16. The now famous blogger said he was jailed because he challenged tradition.""There are things we inherit without even thinking about them,"" Nabil said. ""I tried to change my way of thinking.

""I tried to read what was forbidden in our house, things written by people who in my home and in religious institutions are considered infidels."" Nabil had at times been kept in solitary confinement, largely prohibited from communicating with his lawyers until late January, according to an Amnesty International statement.

His time in prison has rendered him a cause celebre among bloggers and other advocates of free expression.

But the former law student is not the only blogger to be arrested for expressing controversial views in Egypt. In January, police detained Al-Jazeera producer Howayda Taha Matwali after her work on a documentary that examined alleged torture in Egyptian police stations, the statement said.

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