Airlines Finally Move Away From Sexist Dress Code Policies

British Airways takes a major step in doing away with the sexist approach airlines have toward females and their dress code policies.

After two years of fighting for their rights, the cabin crew of British Airways finally won the right to forgo a skirt and wearing trousers with their uniform instead.

The crews union, Unite, stated that the airline was “joining the 21st century” by allowing a change in the dress code.

The “mixed fleet” crop of women hired recently were restricted to skirts, unless exempted on religious or medical grounds. Apparently 83 percent of the crew wanted to wear trousers for warmth or protection, according to the union.

“Not only is the choice to wear trousers a victory for equality it is also a victory for common sense and testament to the organizing campaign of our members,” said Unite regional officer Matt Smith. “Female cabin crew no longer have to shiver in the cold, wet and snow of wintery climates, but also can be afforded the protection of trousers at destinations where there is a risk of malaria or the Zika virus.”

This is surely a step forward in giving people more freedom to choose what they wear, and doing away with the sexist approach in professions such as flight attendants. Other airlines are also taking part in small but important changes; female crew members of Ryanair, for example, are no longer required to pose in bikinis for its annual calendar.

The airline industry has always been particularly sexist toward females, with some airlines making them parade in swimwear in order to be selected and imposing a wide range of rules regarding dress code and appearance.

Read: Your Bikini Body Determines If You Can Be A Flight Attendant In China

However, this step by British Airways is a hope that in the future cabin crews will be chosen on the basis of their capabilities of being a good host, rather than on their bikini body. Allowing women to wear trousers too, gives females from more religious and cultural backgrounds to be part of the airline industry.