5 Times Rapists Won On U.S. College Campuses

by
editors
No substantial progress was made in 2014 to deal with campus rape cases.

campus rape

When the Department of Education released a list of 55 colleges with open “sexual violence investigations” earlier in May, it started a nationwide discussion on how institutions are equally responsible for the plight of campus rape survivors after they failed, or in many cases refused, to address their complaints.

With the release of the list – which included the names of three Ivy League universities: Harvard University (its college and its law school), Princeton University and Dartmouth College – many thought it would bring about a huge change in the way people talk about rape culture in the United States.

Unfortunately, it didn’t.

While the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights opened inquiries into several colleges named in the list, no substantial progress has been made so far.

In fact, there have been several instances which prove that the U.S. still has a long way to go to curb rape on campuses. A few have been listed below.

Top education officials blamed survivors for the assault

Victim-blaming statements from top college officials have done more harm than good for rape survivors.

Eckerd College president Donald Eastman III, on whose campus there have been more than a dozen reported sex offenses since 2011, recently implied in an open letter if students were more virtuous in their approach to casual sex and drinking then we wouldn't have a sexual assault problem on campuses.

Before him, Stephen Trachtenberg, the former president of George Washington University, appeared on The Diane Rehm Show and said  women have to "be trained not to drink in excess" so that they can defend themselves against men who "misbehave." 

So did law enforcement

When a University of Connecticut student went on to report her rape, this is what a campus police officer “advised” her:

"Women need to stop spreading their legs like peanut butter or rape is going to keep on happening till the cows come home."

This is just one of many similar examples why rape survivors don’t go to the police for help. A 2000 DOJ study found that less than 5 percent of college rape victims reported their attack to law enforcement; of the 95 percent who didn't report, a quarter said they were afraid of being treated with hostility.

And things, according to multiple accounts by sexual assault survivors, haven’t really changed in the course of fourteen years.

Anti-rape activists were called “hysterical”

Caroline Kitchens, a research assistant at the right-wing think tank American Enterprise Institute, stated in a now-infamous Time magazine that “21st century America does not have a rape culture” and that “on college campuses, obsession with eliminating 'rape culture' has led to censorship and hysteria.”

Also, while addressing Ohio State University’s new policies on consent for sexual intercourse in the light of recent campus rape cases, shock jock Rush Limbaugh – often referred to as the most-listened-to radio host – suggested that permission to have sex “takes all the romance out of everything.”

Colleges planned to introduce consent forms

In what was clearly a desperate attempt to tackle campus on rape cases soon after the release of the list, educational institutions in California planned to introduce bizarre “consent forms” which required  two willing people to sign a document to ensure no coercion would be involved during sexual intercourse.

Predictably, the proposal was slammed by anti-rape – and reasonable –folks, who argued that the forms were an excuse for university administrators to wash their hands off sexual assault on campus.

Colleges started punishing people standing up against sexual assault on campus

Instead of addressing rape complaints, some universities have started this trend where they punish people speaking out against sexual assault on campus.

Columbia University, where student Emma Sulkowicz started an unusual protest against her rapist by carrying a large, twin-size dorm room mattress everywhere, charged protesters $471 to clean the mattresses they carried to shame the university.

Meanwhile, anti-rape activists in Syracuse University were hand-delivered envelopes from the institution's assistant general counsel with their names and ID numbers on them. These contained copies of the code of student conduct that had the rules they were breaking highlighted.

Protesters claimed the university’s administration had turned to “intimidation tactics rather than continuing negotiations with students.”

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