Chris Hayes Bursts Into Laughter As Carter Page Claims He Briefed CIA

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Carter Page says if he had contacts with Russia, U.S. intelligence agencies would know because he offered “insights” to the CIA on incidents “happening around the world.”

 

 

It’s official: The more Carter Page tries to convince people he didn’t talk to Russian officials, the guiltier he appears.

Page, one of the several of top former Donald Trump aides accused of having shady contacts with Russia, appeared on MSNBC's "All In With Chris Hayes" and made a rather astonishing claim.

He claimed he was innocent because if he had kept any contact with Russian officials, U.S. intelligence agencies would have known about it.

Why?

Well, because Page, who is an energy consultant, has had “tens of hours of discussions” with both the CIA and the FBI "numerous" times over the last few years.

The statement prompted Hayes to burst into laughter.

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The host pointed out he had never heard of intelligence agencies casually asking around for help from people like Page.

To that, the former Trump aide replied by saying, “Very often the agencies ask for background on things that are happening around the world and very often I have offered insights.”

Now, Page failed to provide any proof to support his claim. It’s still not known what exact “things” the CIA and FBI asked him for “background” and “insights” and when.

Hayes, understandably, looked thoroughly unconvinced.

This isn’t the first time Page was grilled on the show. In March, Hayes brilliantly cornered the ex-Trump associate into confessing — sort of — that he met with Russia's ambassador to the U.S. Sergey Kislyak at last year's Republican National Convention, just 15 days after Page claimed that he didn’t meet any Russian officials.

Quite obviously then, almost nobody believes Page’s latest claim that he could’ve briefed the CIA:

 

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