Chinese Citizens Prefer American Products

The Boston Consulting Group reports that 61 percent of Chinese consumers say they would prefer to buy items made in United Sates than those made in China. Chinese consumers see American products as of higher quality than their Chinese counterparts, and are even willing to pay a premium for them.

China, Chinese Economy, Made in America

 

It seems Americans aren’t the only ones interested in American-made goods.

The Boston Consulting Group reports that 61 percent of Chinese consumers say they would prefer to buy items made in United Sates than those made in China. Chinese consumers see American products as of higher quality than their Chinese counterparts, and are even willing to pay a premium for them.

"The Chinese consumer is quietly concerned about what they're getting," said Hal Sirkin who co-authored the study.

These results contrast the general perception of Chinese culture which, supposedly, endorses the growth of China as a growing world power. Chinese consumers know that by buying American-made products, that they are supporting their economic rival.

Sirkin believes that the U.S. items deserve the preferential treatment they receive across the globe. He said, "If you're going to have things that have a long life, like mechanics' hand tools, there's real premiums for 'Made in USA' over a foreign brand because the quality is better."

The BCC concludes in their report that the U.S. should make efforts to increase production of goods in the country. In the past decade, numerous retailers have relocated their production overseas where cheaper work leads to higher profits.

The BCC argues that because US goods are preferred not only in America, but in other countries as well, that there is money to be made with US goods, and that an increase and sales will make up for reduced margins.

An increase in products made in the U.S. will only mean good things for the country as a whole. More products made in the country will mean more employment, and more money coming into America instead of out of it.

Despite this good news, it is unlikely major corporations like Wal-Mart will move work back to America when so much of the companies’ success stems from cheap prices based on 3rd-world labor. Until major corporations see enough money in moving production back home, they are unlikely to do so.

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