Chinese Film Rewrites WWII History, Chairman Mao Lies Exposed Online

Maryam Tajalli
Ever been so patriotic that you forcefully inserted your leaders into important past conferences that changed the course of history?

Bloggers and Internet users are exposing an upcoming Chinese movie that places communist leader Mao Zedong smack in the center of a historical conference he never attended.   

In The Cairo Declaration, dramatizing China’s fight against Japan, eager filmmakers placed Mao in the middle of a WWII summit with U.S. and U.K. leaders.

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Many people and groups condemned the untruthful portrayal of the important historic event in the movie where nationalist leader Chiang Kai-Shek should have been given credit for his efforts by filmmakers, but instead was blatantly replaced with Mao.

Chinese Film Places Mao, The Cairo Declaration

The Cairo Conference, which is the focus of the controversial film, was a meeting held near the pyramids where Chiang Kai-Shek, Winston Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt met to discuss the proceedings of war and draft Asia’s possible future.

The communist party’s leader was not only depicted as a main player in the conference, which labeled China as one of the “world’s four great powers,” but was also made the film’s main poster boy.

"By featuring Mao, who was not present at the meeting, but excluding Chiang, the poster shows no respect for history nor to Mao," Chinese cultural critic Sima Pingbang told the media.

Chinese Internet users also aren't very impressed with the film’s inaccuracy, and soon after the poster’s release, dozens of spoofs and parodies popped up, replacing Mao with different leaders, shown attending the conference.

website was also set up where anyone could upload their picture and take credit for the Cairo Declaration. 

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A spokesperson for The Cairo Declaration revealed to Global Times that the Mao poster was a tribute to the communist party’s efforts during the Second World War. They also assured the critics that Chiang would not be ignored and posters featuring him are in the making.