Christian Group Warns Of Judgment Day May 21

Judgment Day is just ten days away, the signs warn. Billboards are showing up seemingly everywhere, especially in major Canadian cities, proclaiming May 21 as the definitive end of the world as we know it.

Judgment Day is just ten days away, the signs warn. Billboards are showing up seemingly everywhere, especially in major Canadian cities, proclaiming May 21 as the definitive end of the world as we know it.

One of the strongest backers behind the movement is Family Radio, a California-based sectarian Christian group actually sending caravans of believers into Vancouver and Calgary, who says their president Harold Camping came up with the Judgment Day prediction based on strong biblical evidence.

"Mr. Camping saw God had placed, in scripture, many important signs and proofs. These proofs alert believers that May 21st of 2011 is the date Christ will return for His people and begin a period of the final destruction of the world." All will be over on Oct. 21, "when God will completely destroy this earth and its surviving inhabitants," the website says.

Many scholars and historians find inconsistencies with Camping's interpretation of the Bible, and it should be noted that this isn't the first time Camping has predicted the end of the world. He also saw the end near in 1994, but on its website Family Radio says, "important subsequent Biblical information was not yet known."

Whether you fear the end or not, it's interesting to take a look at this list compiled by CBC News of other notable Judgment Day predictions:

Doomsday predictions:

End-of-the-world predictions — or suggestions of other calamities — have been made for centuries. Here's a look at some of them:

Dec. 12, 2012. The Mayan calendar is widely misinterpreted as ending on that date. Many have predicted that cataclysmic events will take place.

Jan. 1, 2000. Otherwise known as Y2K, it was a widespread prediction that computers wouldn't be able to handle the arrival of 01/01/2000. They did.

Aug. 18, 1999. Charles Criswell King, an American psychic, said the world would end that day. His other predictions ranged from Denver being struck by a ray from space to saying in March 1963 that something would happen to U.S. President John F. Kennedy in November 1963 that would mean he wouldn't run for re-election in 1964.

Dec. 17, 1919. Meteorologist Albert Porta said that six planets would come together that day, with the resulting magnetic current causing the Earth to be engulfed by the exploding sun.

1914: Based on the Bible's book of Daniel, the Jehovah's Witnesses (Watchtower Bible and Tract Society) estimated the beginning of the war of Armageddon. It was one of several similar predictions.

Oct. 22, 1844. Followers of American Baptist preacher William Miller, founder of the Millerite movement, considered it the Great Disappointment when the second coming of Jesus, which he had predicted, did not occur on that date.

(Photo: Courtesy Brian Cameron/Flickr.com)

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