Christie Says Yes To Obamacare Medicaid, CPAC Says No To Christie

Owen Poindexter
Chris Christie will accept the federally-funded Medicaid expansion under Obamacare, and, in coincidental but related news, got snubbed by the major conservative convention CPAC.

The Republican Party needs Chris Christie, but do they want him? PHOTO: Wikimedia Commons
UPDATE: The National Review quoted an anonymous CPAC insider who said that Christie will not speak at CPAC because he has a "limited future" in politics, due to his position on gun control. Makes me wonder if he's actually talking about a Republican party that wouldn't include Christie.
If you wanted a symbol for the schizophrenia within the Republican Party, you could do a lot worse than Chris Christie's day today. Christie is one of the nation's most popular governors and most popular Republicans generally. He seems to speak his mind and make decisions without too much thought to political calculations (of course he does think about political calculations, but he manages to act like he doesn't).
Today Chris Christie will announce that he will accept the government expansion of Medicaid under Obamacare, a deal that more and more Republican governors are finding difficult to turn down. Under the Medicaid expansion, 300,000 uninsured New Jerseyians will get insurance, and the expansion will be funded completely by the federal government at first, and over time, 10% of the cost will shift to New Jersey. We also learned today that Christie will not be invited to speak at the great Republican powwow, CPAC (Conservative Political Action Conference). CPAC serves as an excellent barometer for who is conservative enough for the current Republican party, and right now Christie doesn't make the cut.
Both accepting Obamacare and getting rejected by CPAC will serve Christie well in his reelection campaign in November of this year, the question is what it would mean for him nationally. Christie is a pro-life fiscal conservative, but he has praised President Obama, most notably for his help with Hurricane Sandy, right before the 2012 election, and criticized House Republicans for not helping Sandy victims promptly. He has worked across the aisle in his mostly Democratic state and governed as something of an independent.

The Republican party needs a place for Chris Christie, but today shows how the most vocal and galvanized wing of the party doesn't seem to want him.