Cleveland Police Still Blame Tamir Rice For His Own Shooting Death

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editors
The insensitive letter by the head of Cleveland police union states how Tamir Rice’s family should spend their settlement money.

Tamir Rice

The head of the Cleveland police union said the family of Tamir Rice, who was shot dead by a white officer while playing with a plastic toy gun, should use the money from the $6 million settlement to educate children on the use of firearms or their replicas.

Steve Loomis, the president of the Cleveland Police Patrolman’s Association, sparked outrage on a national level when he responded to the restitution with a letter to the media.

Cleveland Police

The letter states: “We can only hope the Rice family and their attorneys will use a portion of this settlement to help educate the youth of Cleveland in the dangers associated with the mishandling of both real and facsimile firearms.”

The letter offers no apology or admission of police wrongdoing, nor does the settlement to Rice's family.

While Loomis is busy blaming a 12-year-old for his own death, perhaps some of those suggestions should apply to police as well, like educating officers that shooting a child on sight is an abomination.

Read More: Is This Picture The Reason Jurors Didn’t Indict Tamir Rice’s Killers?

“Anyone has ever wondered whether ‘tone deafness’ is a real thing need look no further than the police union leadership,” the Rice’s family Subodh Chandra said in response.

 

 

 

It also raises questions as to why the police union failed to apologize for Beth Mandl, the dispatcher who failed to mention to the police that the gun the 12-year-old boy was carrying was “probably fake” — or why the officers responsible for the tragedy faced no indictment charges. It is quite disconcerting that Loomis emphasized educating kids on the use of firearms and not the cops under his supervision to use their state-issued weapons with more responsibility.

Related: Tamir Rice's Killer Walks: Another Predictable End To Police Shootings

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