Coroner Says Girl Died After Abusive Texts

A NEW Zealand coroner is calling for a law against text and cyber bullying in the wake of a 15-year-old girl's death after receiving "extraordinarily abusive" texts from an ex-boyfriend's wife.

Took a large number of her father's heart pill after recieving abusive texts.A NEW Zealand coroner is calling for a law against text and cyber bullying in the wake of a 15-year-old girl's death after receiving "extraordinarily abusive" texts from an ex-boyfriend's wife.

Rotorua schoolgirl Hayley Ann Fenton died in hospital in July 2009, after intentionally taking her father's heart pills, four days after her 27-year-old boyfriend, Pelesasa Tuimalu, ended their five-month relationship via text message.

Coroner Wallace Bain says Miss Fenton took the pills because of "vicious, bullying texts" from Tuimalu's estranged wife, Elima Tuimalu, including a barrage of abuse on July 16 which read: "Stop f***en texting my husband you ugly bitch or I'll f***en smash your face".

Miss Fenton sent a text message to Mr Tuimalu in the early afternoon of July 17, saying she had taken her father's medication, but minutes later said she no longer wanted to die and could he take her to hospital.

Two hours later, Mrs Tuimalu responded, saying: "Don't text me again just f*** off I don't care if you kill yourself I not even like you arsehole".

About 4.30pm that day, Miss Fenton asked her family for help.

She died in Rotorua Hospital the following day.

Mr Bain ruled that Miss Fenton's death was not a suicide, because she had asked for help.

He said the "overarching and death-determining cause" of her death was the text messages from Mrs Tuimalu.

Mr Bain says serious consideration should be given to a law to deter "abusive and malicious content" via text messages and the internet, which had led to the deaths of a number of young people.

He recommended his findings be referred to the Law Commission, which is currently working on the issue of cyber bullying, along with the Attorney-General and Minister of Justice, to consider a law change.