Crackdown On Pro Morsi Activists, What’s Next For Egypt?

by
Fatimah Mazhar
In response to a planned security crackdown, groups of pro-Morsi protesters are protecting themselves against armored patrol vehicles and possible force include building concrete and wooden barriers, and buying gas masks, goggles and gloves.

Pro Morsi Crackdown: More Violence Ahead?

In response to a planned security crackdown, groups of pro-Morsi protesters are protecting themselves against armored patrol vehicles and possible force include building concrete and wooden barriers, and buying gas masks, goggles and gloves.

And so far, they have been successful in keeping the Egyptian security forces at bay, according to news reports.

But this is the last thing Egypt needs right now. Already more than 300 people, including dozens of pro Morsi activists, have been shot dead by the country’s military.

Protests and demonstrations in Egypt have never been peaceful. The ones held in order to overthrow Hosni Mubarak in 2011 and later Morsi this year were extremely violent and hostile, especially for women who were brutally raped for participating in the rallies.

Also Read: Top 5 Factors Behind Anti - Mohamed Morsi “Mass” Protests In Egypt

Egypt has been in a constant state of economic and political turmoil since 2011. Mohamed Morsi wasn’t able to serve the interests of a majority of Egyptians who ousted him after organizing the largest demonstrations since the Arab Spring and probably the biggest protests in the country’s history earlier in June.

Apparently, the protests have not been able to produce fruitful results. And this time around, it’s not going to be anything different. The Egyptian military has proved twice that it does not know how to disperse crowds by fatally shooting opposition activists. And as they prepare for another crackdown this week, chances are that it might lead to more bloodshed. And let’s just assume, even if the pro Morsi protesters succeed in reinstating their leader, who is to guarantee that the anti Morsi activists will not try to oust him again?

Clearly, things in Egypt do not look good and a definite solution is needed that would be acceptable to both the pro and anti Morsi Egyptians in order to avoid more clashes and loss of life.

And the army, unfortunately, is obviously not capable of doing that.

Related: The Egyptians, Salafists, Army Or God: Who Can Save Egypt?

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