David Cameron Named UK Prime Minister

New British Prime Minister David Cameron wants to form a coalition government between his Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats, he said Tuesday. Cameron was invited to form the next government by Queen Elizabeth II about one hour after she accepted Gordon Brown's resignation Tuesday evening. The right-wing Conservatives won the largest number of seats in last week's election, but not enough to let them govern on their own. Brown's left-wing Labour Party came in second, and the Liberal Democrats third. A Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition would have the majority of MPs in the House of Commons. Cameron praised his predecessor in brief remarks outside 10 Downing Street before disappearing into prime minister's official residence with his wife Samantha.

SOURCE: http://edition.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/europe/05/11/uk.cameron.conservative/index.html?hpt=T1

 David Cameron, New UK Prime Minister

London, England (CNN) -- New British Prime Minister David Cameron wants to form a coalition government between his Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats, he said Tuesday.

Cameron was invited to form the next government by Queen Elizabeth II about one hour after she accepted Gordon Brown's resignation Tuesday evening.

The right-wing Conservatives won the largest number of seats in last week's election, but not enough to let them govern on their own.

Brown's left-wing Labour Party came in second, and the Liberal Democrats third. A Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition would have the majority of MPs in the House of Commons.

Cameron praised his predecessor in brief remarks outside 10 Downing Street before disappearing into prime minister's official residence with his wife Samantha.

Cameron said he aims "to form a proper and full coalition between the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats," saying it would be "the right way to provide this country with the strong, the stable, the good and decent government that I believe we need so badly."

He added he wants "to put aside party differences and work together for the common good and the national interest."

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Cameron becomes the country's first Conservative prime minister since the Labour Party, under Tony Blair, defeated John Major in 1997.

He is Queen Elizabeth II's 13th prime minister -- including Harold Wilson twice, for his two non-consecutive terms -- since she was crowned in 1952.

As he was traveling from Buckingham Palace to 10 Downing Street -- ashort drive -- the palace issued a statement saying: "The Queen received the Right Honourable David Cameron this evening and requested him to form a new administration. The Right Honourable David Cameron accepted Her Majesty's offer and Kissed Hands upon his appointment as Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury."

The Liberal Democrats were due to meet Tuesday night to vote on their course of action.

Brown announced his intention to quit outside 10 Downing Street before being driven to Buckingham Palace to formally hand his resignation to the queen.

Brown said: "My resignation as leader of the Labour Party will take effect immediately."

Brown said he loved the job of prime minister not for pomp and ceremony, but "for its potential to make this country I love fairer, more tolerant, more green, more democratic, more prosperous and more just."

He called the job the "second most important I could ever hold," but said he looked forward to spending more time in the first -- husband and father.

He said earlier that he would recommend Cameron as his replacement.

Nick Clegg's Liberal Democrats first started coalition talks with the Conservatives, then began meetings with Labour.

Brown announced Monday he would step down later in the year, a move that was seen as clearing the way for a potential Labour-Liberal Democrat alliance. But talks between the two ended just after lunch Tuesday.

Shortly after the Labour-Lib Dem talks ended, Liberal Democrat negotiators entered a meeting with the Conservative Party.

Clegg added: "I'm as impatient as anybody else to get on with this, to resolve matters one way or another."

Conservative negotiator William Hague said as he entered the meeting: "We believe very strongly that there should be a government with a strong and secure majority in the House of Commons, and of course with an elected prime minister. We remain very firmly of that view. We set out our proposals to achieve that yesterday, and we have come here to hear the Liberal Democrats' response."

Cameron said Tuesday morning he had made a "very open, very reasonable offer" to the Liberal Democrats during the discussions.

"I hope they make the right decision," Cameron said outside his London home.