Easing Tensions: North Korea Reopens Abandoned Hotline With South

by
Fatimah Mazhar
So finally some good news has come out after a really long time from the Korean Peninsula. What started off with a nuclear test and turned into threats of war has resulted into re-opening of abandoned connections.

North Korea south korea

So finally some good news has come out after a really long time from the Korean Peninsula. What started off with a nuclear test and turned into threats of war has resulted into re-opening of abandoned connections.

Though no one was such paying attention to the nuclear war threats coming from the North, there were high chances of serious conflict between DPRK and South Korea. The North's official KCNA news agency quoteda spokesman from the North saying, “We appreciate the fact that the South side promptly and positively responded to the proposal made by us for holding talks between the authorities of both sides.”

Previously, the exchange of words between the two was something like this:

Kim Jong Un has finally signed the plan on technical preparations of strategic rockets of the KPA, ordering them to be standby for fire so that they may strike any time the U.S. mainland, its military bases in South Korea.”

To which South Korea replied by saying:

I am telling you this as a member of the human race: If North Korea (DPRK) attacks South Korea with nuclear weapons, the Kim Jong Un regime will vanish from the earth by the will of the humanity.”

Concern grew in region as both severed cross border links including the Red Cross hotline in mid-March. Though the hotline, established in 1971, in Panmunjom had been cut before in 2010 but the step was worrisome nevertheless, amid all the threats and military exercises. It was probably the most disturbing move taken by North Korea to provoke international concern ever since it had conducted its third nuclear test in February.

Though the move on North Korea’s part is being considered more an economic move rather than political in order to reopen the Kaesong Factory which is one of North Korea's few hard currency earners, producing $2 billion a year in trade with the South. North Korea increased pressure on Seoul by delaying access to the factory in a move to trap hundreds of South Korean workers on the northern side of the world's most militarized border in April.

Let’s see whether the move helps the Korean Peninsula or not.

Carbonated.TV