Egyptian Google Exec Is "Ready To Die" For Change

Egyptian Google executive Wael Ghonim is "ready to die" to bring change to Egypt, he said Wednesday. In an exclusive interview with CNN, Ghonim also said it is "no longer the time to negotiate" with the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. "There's a lot of blood now" that has been spilled, he said.

Egyptian cyberactivist Wael Ghonim speaks with the press at Cairo's Tahrir square on February 8, 2011 following his release late on February 7 after being held blindfolded by the Egyptian security service for 12 days.

Egyptian Google executive Wael Ghonim is "ready to die" to bring change to Egypt, he said Wednesday.

In an exclusive interview with CNN, Ghonim also said it is "no longer the time to negotiate" with the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

"There's a lot of blood now" that has been spilled, he said.

Ghonim played a key role in organizing the protests that have convulsed Egypt for more than two weeks. He was the administrator of a Facebook page that is widely credited with calling the first protest January 25.

He was released recently after being detained for a week and a half.

Ghonim appealed to top officials in the Egyptian government, saying "If you are true Egyptians, if you are heroic Egyptians, it's time to step down."

He said he was uncomfortable about becoming the face of the Egyptian popular uprising. He said "This is not about me" several times during an hour-long and emotional interview in a relative's Cairo apartment.

Human Rights Watch said Tuesday the number of people killed in the Egyptian protests has reached 302 -- 232 in Cairo, 52 in Alexandria and 18 in Suez.

CNN