Customer Attacks Uber Driver Thinking He Was Muslim

“He said he’s gonna shoot me right in the face. He’s gonna strangle me,” said Uber driver Samson Woldemichael who was attacked for “being Muslim.”

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A man in North Carolina attacked and threatened an Uber driver after mistaking him for a Muslim.

But Samson Woldemichael, the victim, is in fact “a dedicated Christian.”

The assault reportedly took place on Sunday when the passenger was picked up from a bar. Although everything was normal in the beginning of the ride, things turned violent when the man asked Woldemichael if he was Muslim.

It was then the passenger threatened to kill the driver and hit him on the forehead.

“He said he’s gonna shoot me right in the face. He’s gonna strangle me,” Woldemichael added. “I asked him why. He was calling me too many bad word names… insulting me. He told me I was a Muslim.”

Uber promptly responded to the incident saying they're working with police.

"First and foremost, we're relieved the driver is OK and was not seriously injured. Discrimination of any kind is unacceptable and is not tolerated on the Uber platform," an Uber spokesperson said. "As soon as we were made aware, we permanently removed the rider’s account."

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This is believed to be yet another reprisal against Muslims in the United States in the wake of terrorist attacks in Paris last week.

In Connecticut, multiple gunshots were reportedly fired at the Baitul Aman mosque in Meriden just hours after the attacks in France. On the same day at the University of Connecticut, the words "killed Paris" were discovered beneath an Egyptian student's name on his dorm room door.

A Florida man was arrested for threatening to bomb two Florida mosques, because the events in Paris made him “very mad.” And in Oklahoma, cops shot a man who told 911 he would shoot “anything that looks like a Muslim.”

Someone threw feces and tore pages of the Quran at the entrance of the Islamic Center of Pflugerville in Texas while a man in Fort Bend County was arrested over accusation of making a terroristic threat on social media that he was going to "shoot up a mosque."

Muslim leaders, according to CBS News, have also reported incidents of vandalism, threats and other hate crimes targeting mosques in Nebraska, Florida, Texas, Kentucky, Virginia, Tennessee, Ohio, New York and other states.

"The picture is getting increasingly bleak," stated Ibrahim Hooper, a spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations. "There's been an accumulation of anti-Islamic rhetoric in our lives and that I think has triggered these overt acts of violence and vandalism."

Read More: This Is What A Muslim Driver In U.S. Faced Night Of The Paris Attack

Perhaps the world should take Woldemicahel’s advice who, after undergoing a horrific experience of religious profiling, told the Huffington Post:  "Don't generalize. It's a mistake to generalize a group of people, including Muslims."