Fed-up College Graduate Sells Diploma Online For $50K To Pay Off Loans

Jessica Renae Buxbaum
A college graduate who has been unable to find a job in her field is now selling her diploma on eBay for $50,000 to help pay off her student loans.

Stephanie Ritter

A frustrated college graduate who has been unable to find a job in her field for four years is now selling her diploma on eBay for $50,000 to help pay off her student loans.

Stephanie Ritter graduated from Florida State University with a degree in theater in 2011 and has been unable to secure a job in her chosen career path so she decided to sell her diploma for a whopping $50,000 to cover the actual cost of her education and “validate my use of time between 2007-2011.”

“I thought this piece of paper has so much worth to so many people, but for a theater major, it couldn’t mean less,” she told Buzzfeed. “I’m doing the exact same things and probably getting paid the exact same amount as people that dropped out halfway through freshman year, except I’m still $40,000 in debt and they’re, well, not.”

Stephanie Ritter

The 26-year-old is not just selling her diploma but also a "college experience" including tours of the campus and surrounding area and even access to her college memories via Facebook albums.

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"Why waste four years of your life going to a state school for a piece of paper when you can just buy mine? I graduated from Florida State University in 2011 and have yet to use my diploma, so save yourself the time and buy college experience,” the listing reads, satirically poking fun at the idea of earning a degree that clearly won’t pay off.

Ritter's, who works as a personal assistant in Los Angeles, job struggles resonates with many recent college graduates who have yet to see their time and dedication spent in school earn them anything more than a slip of paper.

As Buzzfeed notes, a recent study done by the Federal Reserve found that only 27% of college graduates have jobs related to their degrees.

Furthermore, college is coming across even more ominously worthless as student debt continues to skyrocket with the class of 2015 the most indebted ones yet, averaging a student-loan debt of a little more than $35,000. 

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And despite the various classes Ritter took from Play Analysis to Set Design, none seemed to offer marketable skills that could give the graduate a competitive edge in the workforce. Another frowned upon distinction in today’s education system is that students walk away with a degree but not enough career building skills and tools to help market themselves in an increasingly cutthroat and ambitious environment.

If Ritter’s hilariously genius solution to sell her diploma doesn’t work in paying off her debts, though, she hopes “a very rich family would adult Daddy Warbucks me.”

And if that plan fails?

“If that falls through, honestly, [I will] just do that thing where I pay the minimum for 25 years and then the government feels so bad for you that they wipe it clean,” she said. 

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