California Inferno Quadruples In Size As Thousands Flee

Amna Shoaib
The raging Sand Fire has emptied more than 1,500 homes, spread to nearly 60 miles and charred tens of thousands of acres of land.

California is under fire again as a wildfire sparked on Friday afternoon nearly doubled in size.



The fired started raging Friday afternoon on just 5 acres of land north of Los Angeles. Feeding on dry bush, it quickly seared 3,000 more acres. The ashes from the inferno landed miles away from the actual spot of the fire, further spreading the region affected by the fire and a dense smoke canopy blanketed the area. Officials had to issue smoke advisory for residents living as far as 60 miles away. By Saturday noon, the fire had eaten its way through 31 square miles north of Los Angeles.



By Saturday evening, firefighters had had little success in containing the fire, which was now flaming in 20,000 acres of California.  Speaking to BuzzFeed News, Daryl Osby, fire chief of the LA County Fire Department, said that in different conditions, the fire could have been stopped at the ridge before it grew too large. But this was California, where five years of drought and soaring temperatures provided favorable conditions for such fires.



More than 900 firefighters have been deployed to battle the fire, with 40 engines to structure protection if the fire reached residential areas. Evacuation efforts have also been expanded to include around 1,500 homes. With the threat of a growing fire looming large, officials have also evacuated several residents in Sand Canyon, Placerita Canyon and Little Tujunga.



LA County sheriff officials also informed KLTA that they were investigating the body of a man found in North Iron Canyon Road, one of the areas evacuated after the fire. The officials suspect that his death was connected to the fire.



It's just not the actual fire concerning the firefighters. They are also closely monitoring the winds, which could easily and quickly steer the flames to Los Angeles.



Even as dusk fell, firefighters were using night-flying aircrafts to build a containment line around the fire.



By Sunday morning, just 20 percent of the fire was contained.