First-Grader Beaten Up By Classmates Because Of His Religion

Amna Shoaib
Donald Trump's New America is clear about who will, and will not, be accepted in its classrooms, parks and public spaces.

A Facebook user named Zeeshan ul-hassan Usmani uploaded a photo on Oct. 8, showing his son sitting with a cast slung around his arm.

Usmani, who is a computer scientist based in North Carolina, claims his 7-year-old child was bullied and beaten at school for being a Muslim.

He posted the photo with the caption, reading: "Welcome to the United States of America of Donald Trump. Meet my son Abdul Aziz. He is in grade 1, bullied and beaten by his own classmates in school bus for being a Muslim."


The child sits stoically in the photo, a faint smile on his lips. It does not, however, take a psychologist to recognize that it was an obviously traumatizing and emotionally jarring experience for a child in his formative years.

Although Usmani's post places the responsibility of the current anti-Muslim environment on Trump's incendiary rhetoric, it must be noted that the Republican nominee has fueled and fanned the fire of xenophobia that existed long before he ran for president.

That said, the relation between Trump's rise in the presidential race and the recent uptick in Islamophobic hate crimes cannot be ignored. According to a new report by researchers at California State University, San Bernardino, the past year, anti-Muslim hate crimes — including arson, murder, assault and violent threats — were at their highest levels, up to 78 percent, since 2014.

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Banner image credit: Facebook user, Zeeshan-ul-hassan Usmani