Sheriff's "Politically Incorrect" Welcome Sign Tells Haters To Leave

At a time when everyone is over-zealously obsessed with political correctness, a small county in Georgia proudly declares itself “politically incorrect.”

Georgia Harris County Sheriff

Welcome signs are meant to greet people arriving into town. However, a welcome sign outside Harris County Sheriff’s Department in central Georgia is drawing attention for warning people that they might get offended with the politics of the town.

County Sheriff Mike Jolley paid out of his pocket to place an unconventional sign outside his department building, declaring the town as “politically incorrect.”

“WARNING: Harris County is politically incorrect,” reads the sign placed in front of the Harris County Sheriff’s Office. “We say: Merry Christmas, God Bless America and In God We Trust. We salute our troops and our flag. If this offends you … LEAVE!”

The town has divided opinions on the sign, but Jolley is extremely proud of it. In fact, he claimed that he got the sign created to "stir people’s belief and patriotism” because he was tired of the silent majority becoming “more silent.”

“I believe it's time for the silent majority to stand up for our beliefs and not be ashamed," he said, adding that he was surprised and humbled by the messages of support he has received so far. However, he also admitted that he had some critics. “There are some people who don't like it, and I respect that. That's why I put on the sign that if you don't like it, leave.” 

Jolley plans to install more of these signs across the county and many local families have come forward to support him.

“Are there some haters? Sure. I believe people would complain if they won a million dollars. They’d be mad if they had to pay taxes,” he explained. “If it offends you, if the words on that sign truly offend you, maybe you’re in the wrong place.”

Read More: Has Political Correctness Killed Our Freedom Of Speech?

The “political incorrect” sign has also gained the attention of the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia, which is exploring the situation.

“It reminds me of the 'don't get caught in this town after sundown' signs that used to go up in segregated America,” explained Annie Laurie Gaylor, co-president of the nonprofit group Freedom from Religion Foundation.

Meanwhile, being the law-abiding citizen that he appears to be, Sheriff Jolley has said he will move the sign to private property if a judge orders him to take it down.