Girls Football Team Wore Hijab To Support Team Captain

Team members of the West Broward High School Football team in Florida decided to stand with their fellow teammate and captain and in a show of solidarity wore a headscarf or a hijab for a day.

Girls Football Team Wore Hijab To Support Team Captain

Team members of the West Broward High School Football team in Florida decided to stand with their fellow teammate and captain and in a show of solidarity wore a headscarf or a hijab for a day.

17 year old Iram Khan, captain of the school’s football team often faced name-calling and racial taunts. It wasn’t intended to be a political statement. It was just a group of girls showing support to a fellow and trying to see things from her perspective.

Muslims girls living in America and other western societies face many issues, especially when it comes to wearing the hijab in public. The people in the West have taken a traditional headscarf worn by Muslim women the hijab, as a symbol of oppression and fundamental beliefs. Fed up by the labels and fighting for the right to wear what they want, more and more Muslim women are reclaiming the hijab.

There are an estimated 7 million Muslims in America, many of whom were born and raised there. Some extremist religious factions have propagated Islam’s image as a hard-core religion that oppresses women and does not tolerate people of other faith. 9/11 did not help the matters.

More and more Muslim women now are moving forward take pride in their identity and showing the world another face of the Muslims. But as they increase in number, so do problems.  In recent years there has been furor of opposition against women wearing hijab in schools, offices and the sports arena.

FIFA banned the hijab in 2007. According to FIFA's Laws a player's equipment "must not have any political religious or personal statements."

However, FIFA recently announced that it would allow women to wear specially designed sport hijabs. A final decision on the new headwear is expected in summer. The decision allows Muslim female soccer players to test especially designed head scarves for the next three months, as a lead-up to FIFA’s annual meeting in July, when the ban is expected to be officially overturned.

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