Hugo Chavez Dies: Three TV Programs On His Life & Legacy In Venezuela

by
Owen Poindexter
Hugo Chavez died today, and you are forgiven if you need a little catching up and who he was and what he meant to the world. Here are three programs to help you out with that.

Hugo Chavez, President of Venezuela has died. Chavez was one of the most controversial figures in modern politics: a socialist, champion of the poor, enemy of the United States, and a man sitting on the fourth largest supply of domestic oil. Both for your education, and your ability to sound smart and not-clueless in the coming weeks, here are three programs to help decide how to feel about the deceased Venezuelan president.

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This is a long piece by the CBS program 60 minutes on the Hugo Chavez. It's somewhat dated, having been filmed in 2002, and the biggest story about Chavez then was the coup that briefly deposed him as Venezuelan president. Still, it was a legacy defining moment for Chavez.

Al Jazeera, currently one of the best sources for international journalism ran a long program discussing Hugo Chavez' place in the world after his recent electoral win. It's a little dry, but it gives a comprehensive view of how Chavez was seen around the world as recently as October:

Lastly, if you want a unique look at the coup that Chavez sustained, see The Revolution Will Not Be Televised. An Irish film crew was in Venezuela, filming a documentary about Hugo Chavez, when the coup occured. It's an unusually unfiltered look at Venezuela and Chavez, both of which are usually subject to the inherent filtering of the country and network of whoever happens to be describing him.

Are these films the final word on Hugo Chavez and his legacy in Venezuela? Of course not. But they are a start, and they will help you inform your friends around the proverbial water cooler.

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