Images Of California’s Wildfires Are Straight Out Of The Apocalypse

by
Jessica Renae Buxbaum
A massive wildfire is raging through Northern California’s forests, growing three times its size over the weekend and engulfing 65,000 acres in destructive flames.

wildfire in california

A massive wildfire is raging through Northern California’s forests, growing three times its size over the weekend and engulfing 65,000 acres in destructive flames.

The “Rocky Fire” is the state’s largest ongoing blaze scorching 94 miles and feeding on drought-stricken vegetation. The fire is located in Yolo, Colusa and Lake counties, about 100 miles north of San Francisco. Over 13,000 people have been evacuated and 24 homes and 26 outbuildings have been destroyed so far. The fire has grown so large that it jumped over Highway 20 to consume 200 acres. As of Tuesday, the raging fire was 12 percent contained.  

This year’s wildfire season is moving at an alarming rate with more than 134,000 acres burned already — almost three times the state's 5-year wildfire average of 48,153 acres — and it’s only August. Wildfire season typically peaks for California in September and October, inciting panic for the months ahead. 

Cooler weather has helped firefighters, but the drought and dry thunderstorms (which are expected to continue this week) have created stagnant and unfortunate conditions for the blaze to feast on.

Recommended: Vehicles Go Up In Flames As Wildfire Eats Its Way Across A Freeway

Governor Jerry Brown encapsulated the clear threat of climate change’s role in the summer’s wildfire intensity when he called the state “a tinderbox” in a statement.

"California's severe drought and extreme weather have turned much of the state into a tinderbox.”

Rocky Fire

 

 

 

 

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