Indian Man Carries Out One Of The Biggest Jewelry Heists To Send A Message

by
Fatimah Mazhar
One of the biggest jewelry heists in Hyderabad, India ended in a dramatic twist when the thief willingly surrendered to the police, offering a rather unusual motive for his crime.

Robbery for a cause?

One of the biggest jewelry heists in Hyderabad, India ended in a dramatic twist when the thief willingly surrendered to the police, offering a rather unusual motive for his crime.

23-year-old Kiran Kumar confessed this week that he stole $100,000 worth of gold to highlight widespread social inequality in his country, according to news reports.

Kumar wanted to become a pilot. He also needed money for the corrective surgery of a polio-stricken cousin. He spent many years searching for work in order to make the ends meet and pay for his tuition but all his efforts died in vain.

Recommended: Poor Women In India “Renting Out” Wombs

“I am fed up with the way the system is functioning these days. Politicians are thieves who loot us for five years and I became a thief just for a night to show the world the growing inequality in the country," Kumar was quoted as saying during his investigation.

Although poverty in India had declined from 37.2 percent in 2004-05 to 21.9 percent by 2011-12, according to data released by the Government of India Planning Commission last year, a major chunk of the population remains impoverished.

If given a chance, the burglar claimed he could serve the society better than any politician.

“We were desperate for money to fulfill our dream,” Kumar added. “I tried masonry, plumbing and electric-wiring work, but only got poorer with every passing day.”

After carrying out the robbery, Kumar and his accomplice – supposedly his polio-stricken cousin – were unable to afford a cab. Eventually, they had to walk home with the 15 kg bag of looted gold.

Around ten police units went looking for the thieves when Kumar turned himself in at a local television station.

Read More: Young India Golfers Take Swings At Poverty

Carbonated.TV