Tourist Films Day-To-Day Life For 7 Days In North Korea

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An entrepreneur’s short documentary of his weeklong holiday in North Korea reveals yet another never-before-seen side of the hermit kingdom.

Despite the fact that it’s one of the most dangerous countries in the world to visit, especially for Western tourists, North Korea has long intrigued travelers from across the globe.

Recently, Jacob Laukaitis, a self-proclaimed 22-year-old “online entrepreneur, avid traveler, SEO specialist and occasional writer,” took a seven-day trip to the most secretive state in the world and documented the entire tour in a 14-minute video, as well as Instagram images.

 

While most of the places that he visited have previously been captured on camera by several other photographers, including AP’s award-winner David Guttenfelder, Laukaitis’ narration of his day-to-day experiences provides yet another glimpse inside the hermit kingdom.

For instance, when he visited the Pyongyang Metro  among the deepest in the world  locals appeared to avoid foreigners. Also, after Laukaitis rode on a rather “basic” rollercoaster in an amusement park, he and his tour group were asked to leave the venue, for reasons yet unknown.

Read More: 2.6 Million People Live in Pyongyang - Where Are They?

“I've always been very interested in North Korea because it seemed to be one of the most unique and mysterious countries in the whole world,” he wrote on his YouTube channel.

 

Laukaitis added tourists cannot tell if the different events they are witnessing are staged or not because “you are only shown what they want you to see.” Their guides, according to him, are incredibly domineering and strictly monitor, and sometimes even decide, practically every move a foreigner makes.

 

“That is why I didn't want to offer my opinion about whether things were staged or not, whether they were good or not, or honest or not. My goal was to show you what my day to day life looked like when I was there and let you make up your own mind and judge for yourself.”

Read More: Can This Booming Industry Pull North Korea Out Of Poverty?
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