Footage Shows Island Forming From An Undersea Volcano In Japan VIDEO

by
Sameera Ehteram
The footage in the video is captured by Japan's coast guard showing the emergence of a new island from an erupting undersea volcano just off the coast of Nishinoshima, a small, uninhabited island in the Ogasawara chain, also known as the Bonin Islands.

The footage in the video is captured by Japan's coast guard showing the emergence of a new island from an erupting undersea volcano just off the coast of Nishinoshima, a small, uninhabited island in the Ogasawara chain, also known as the Bonin Islands.

It's just 200 meters in diameter but the powerful eruption sent plumes of smoke almost 600 meters into the air.

Japan's government spokesman welcomed the arrival of the new territory but said it was too early to consider naming it. "In the past there have been such instances but those islands caused by an undersea volcano then sank again so we'll be watching to see what happens," he said.

If the new arrival survives it'll join Japan's estimated 6,000 islands and would technically be part of Tokyo even though it's more than 1,000 kilometers away.

The last time the volcanoes in the area are known to have erupted was in the mid-1970s.

A volcanic island is usually a volcano that is formed at the bottom of the ocean and grows in size until it breaks the surface and forms an island. Some of the most famous volcanic islands are in Hawaii, where it took the action of five volcanoes to form the big island.

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The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration explains the process, “The Earth’s outer crust is made up of a series of tectonic plates that move over the surface of the planet. In areas where the plates come together, sometimes volcanoes will form. Volcanoes can also form in the middle of a plate, where magma rises upward until it erupts on the sea floor, at what is called a “hot spot.”

The Hawaiian Islands where formed by such a hot spot occurring in the middle of the Pacific Plate. While the hot spot itself is fixed, the plate is moving. So, as the plate moved over the hot spot, the string of islands that make up the Hawaiian Island chain were formed.”

We guess it’s just a matter of waiting and seeing whether this new island in Japan lasts or not.

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