Japan’s Population Fell By Quarter OF a Million In 2013

by
Zohaib Ahmed
The world is going one way, Japan another. This statement holds true when you take a look at the recent numbers issued by the Japanese health ministry, which show their total population in 2013 fell by a record margin.

The world is going one way, Japan another. This statement holds true when you take a look at the recent numbers issued by the Japanese health ministry, which show their total population in 2013 fell  by a record margin.

There was no plague, no war, but still there are 244,000 less people in Japan now than there were at the beginning of 2013. Surely the birth of newborns should cover whatever damage the natural deaths are causing to the overall population? A closer look at the provided statistics reveals that 1,275,000 deaths took place last year in the Land of the Rising Sun. The birth of 1,031,000 new babies wasn’t able to offset that drop.

So what is different in Japan? After all, a quarter of a million decline in overall population is no joke. The state hasn’t provided any reasons, which means we’d have to guess our way out of this logjam. Judging by some startling media reports that came out in 2013, it seems adults in Japan have simply lost interest in the opposite sex. Another school of thought feels that the poor working conditions in Japan for mothers make it very difficult for women to think about starting families. And when the choice is between motherhood and careers, most Japanese ladies opt for the latter.

Experts say that if this trend persists, Japan could lose one-third of its total population by 2060 and eventually go into extinction. Since Prime Minister Shinzo Abe took charge in 2012, he has been trying hard to kick start his country’s economy that has been in stagnation for the past two decades. He needs to pay this population issue some attention too to make sure there are enough Japanese left to warrant an economy.

Carbonated.TV