Joe Biden Finally Says Something Right, Calls Out Ben Carson on Homosexuality and Prison Statement

Jessica Renae Buxbaum
Joe Biden bashes Ben Carson for homosexuality and prison comment.

Joe Biden comments on homosexuality

Vice President Joe Biden is known for putting his foot in his mouth, but this time the second-in-command actually said the right thing.

Biden responded to Republican presidential hopeful Ben Carson’s remarks this week about homosexuality and prison. In an interview with CNN on Wednesday, Carson argued that being gay is a choice. “A lot of people who go into prison go into prison straight — and when they come out, they’re gay,” the retired neurosurgeon said.

Thankfully, Biden set the record straight and offered his insight into a deeper political rift among Democrats and Republicans.

"Eight, 10 years ago — even two years ago — homophobic statements would have been, if not embraced, not viewed as having generated any political liability. Look what's happening in the other party today," Biden said in a speech at the Human Rights Campaign in Washington.

Biden continued, “Seriously, don't misread the political trends in history here. Now, every ridiculous assertion — from Dr. Carson on. ... I mean Jesus, God. It's kind of hard to fathom, isn't it?"

Biden points out the serious divide on gay rights between the United States' two main political parties. What Carson said poignantly reveals how the far right understands and treats homosexuality. Despite the broad backlash to Carson's statement and increasing acceptance of LGBTIQ identities in the U.S., the GOP remains seriously committed to being behind the times with their rigid homophobia and failure to reverse their stance on homosexuality.

Carson did apologize for his ignorant comments writing on Facebook, “I do not pretend to know how every individual came to their sexual orientation. I regret that my words to express that concept were hurtful and divisive. For that I apologize unreservedly to all that were offended.”

Biden also highlighted how the comments drummed up “universal ridicule.” 

“That wouldn't have happened two years ago, five years ago,” he said. “It matters, it matters. It shocks the conscience that at this moment in American history, 29 states in America, people are denied basic dignity because of who they are or who they love.”