Justice Scalia Goes Way Overboard In Defending His Homophobia

by
Owen Poindexter
Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia has all the job security in the world, and he should be happy about that after one of his nuttiest quotes to date.


Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia went to bizarre measures to defend his anti-gay moral stance. PHOTO: Reuters

Antonin Scalia set an unofficial record for number of people simultaneously wondering when, if ever, he will retire from the  Supreme Court, and if, when he passes away, he will be replaced, or stay on as Zombie Scalia. Even more impressive, he managed to do it with just a few sentences:

If we cannot have moral feelings against homosexuality, can we have it against murder? Can we have it against other things?

First let’s let the verbose constitutionalist Reagan-appointee explain himself. Those words were in response to a gay student who asked him why Scalia equates laws banning sodomy with those banning bestiality.

“I don't think it's necessary, but I think it's effective," Scalia said. “It's a form of argument that I thought you would have known, which is called the `reduction to the absurd,'” and that’s when he went into his charming little comparison quoted above.

Look, Scalia is entitled to his opinions and his morals, and given the scope of his job, he gets to subject America to those feelings. All that said, he’s dodging the question. He states that he thinks homosexuality is immoral (not directly, but he does imply it cleanly enough). Then, instead of defending that stance, he defends his general right to have morals.

Well you can do that with anything. Let me give you an example. I get a little testy when people leave refrigerator doors open without a good reason. Don’t they know they are making one of their home’s most energy-consumptive appliances kick into overdrive in a dangerously warming planet, just for a second’s worth of convenience? Needless to say, my deeply held feelings have earned me some looks and comments amounting to “why do you care?” Well, that one sentence diatribe above is why I care. That, and my parents were always similarly testy about refrigerator doors, and it stuck far more than all that hard work stuff. But the next time it comes up, one thing I won’t say is “If I can’t care about this, then I can’t care about murder!”

No, the reason isn’t my right to care about things, it’s environmental. So, Scalia, actually explain yourself, don’t pretend like you are being challenged on your right to have feelings. Come to think of it, that’s sort of what YOU are doing when you say that gay people shouldn’t be gay.

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