Lawyer For Wikileaks Founder Assange To Talk To Police About Warrant

London -- The British lawyer for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said Tuesday he planned to talk with London police about an arrest warrant out for his client. Mark Stephens siad he planned to finish talks with London's Metropolitan Police mid-morning Tuesday, after which he and Assange will decide their course of action.

(CNN)

London -- The British lawyer for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said Tuesday he planned to talk with London police about an arrest warrant out for his client.

Mark Stephens siad he planned to finish talks with London's Metropolitan Police mid-morning Tuesday, after which he and Assange will decide their course of action.

Swedish authorities have issued an arrest warrant for Assange so they can talk to him about sex-crime allegations unrelated to WikiLeaks' recent disclosure of secret U.S. documents.

Assange, a 39-year-old Australian, has said he has long feared retribution for his website's disclosures and has called the rape allegations against him a smear campaign.

Sweden first issued the arrest warrant for Assange in November, saying he is suspected of rape, sexual molestation and illegal use of force.

View of the Interpol "wanted" page for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange taken in Washington on December 3

Last week, at the request of Sweden's Stockholm Criminal Court, Interpol issued a "red notice" placing Assange on a list of wanted suspects.

British police then asked Swedish authorities for additional details not specified in the initial arrest warrant, a possible indication that the location of the elusive Assange is known. CNN has not confirmed that Assange is in the United Kingdom.

Swedish prosecutors said Monday that they had sent additional information the British requested and that the case was being handled in accordance with European laws.

WikiLeaks, which facilitates the anonymous leaking of secret information, has been under intense pressure from the United States and its allies since it began posting the first of more than 250,000 U.S. State Department documents on November 28.

Since then, the site has been hit with denial-of-service attacks, been kicked off servers in the United States and France, and found itself cut off from funds in the United States and Switzerland.

In response, the site has rallied supporters to mirror its content "in order to make it impossible to ever fully remove WikiLeaks from the internet," with more than 500 sites responding to the appeal by Monday evening, it said.

ITN