Can You Believe That These Muslim And Jew Artist Are Singing For Christmas?

by
Sameera Ehteram
Liel Kolet and Ebi (Ebrahim Hamedi), singers from extremely different backgrounds, have come together to promote peace and harmony for the upcoming holiday season.

Liel Kolet and Ebi (Ebrahim Hamedi), singers from extremely different backgrounds, have come together to promote peace and harmony for the upcoming holiday season.

Whereas Kolet is an Israeli singer with Jewish parents, Ebi is a Muslim from Iran. With the latest jabs traded between Israel and Iran over the latter’s nuclear program, it is inspiring to see two people from these countries set their differences aside and sing for unity with a third faith; Christianity.  

Both have experienced war and bloodshed in their home countries and want nothing more than to see it end.

Apart from being talented artists, the two are activists who have dedicated their craft to promoting peace and religious tolerance around the world.

Their song, "I Can Hear Christmas," brings a message of peace and unity.

"I thought it completes the message of the song to have those three religions together in a message of unity and of course Christmas is just a beautiful holiday. I'm Jewish and I love Christmas with all the lights and the family being together. It's not about the religious part of this holiday; it's about the whole atmosphere of this holiday, which is about unity and celebrating together. Through this song we are actually celebrating the unity of these religions," says Kolet.

It is refreshing to see such initiatives and fortunately these two are not the only ones taking a stand. An increasing number of Arabs and Jews, or more specifically Muslims and Jews, feel the same and are advocating peaceful coexistence.

Khalas, a Palestinian band and Orphaned Land from Israel, are another example.

"People should be judged by their hearts and inner sincerity, not their religious beliefs," believe members of Orphaned Land.

They perform around the world, spreading awareness and their message of love and coexistence.

Recently, he bands came together to perform across Europe earlier this year.

They performed in six countries, including Britain, and shared a stage as well as a tour bus for three weeks, thus proving that their "metal brotherhood" overrides differences of religion and national identity.

"We can't change the world, but we can give an example of how coexistence is possible," said Kobi Farhi, the lead of Orphaned Land. "Sharing a stage and sharing a bus is stronger than a thousand words. We'll show how two people from different backgrounds who live in a conflict zone can perform together."

"We are metal brothers before everything," agrees Abed Hathut of Khalas. "There is no bigger message for peace than through this tour".

Here’s hoping the world and the Warmongers learn a lesson from all the harbingers of peace out there.

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