Little Ivanka Trump Forced Her House Staff To Buy Lemonade From Her

by
editors
Once upon a time, little Ivanka Trump decided to open up a lemonade stand — and she stopped at nothing to make her struggling business a success.

Ivanka Trump

Ivanka Trump’s 2009 self-help book, “The Trump Card,” is full of some very surprising revelations.

The book itself opens with an extremely incongruent sentence coming from Ivanka (who was, incidentally, born with a silver spoon in her mouth): “In business, as in life, nothing is ever handed to you,” she said, all the while admitting that she “had the great good fortune to be born into a life of wealth and privilege, with a name to match.”

“Yes, I’ve had every opportunity, every advantage. And yes, I’ve chosen to build my career on a foundation built by my father and grandfather,” she wrote, but still had the audacity to maintain she and her siblings didn’t achieve their position in their father Donald Trump’s company “by any kind of birthright or foregone conclusion.”

In fact, she lamented many of her advantages were actually handicaps.

Take this example for instance:

When Ivanka was a little girl, she got frustrated because she couldn’t set up a lemonade stand in her home (Trump Tower), like ordinary children.

“We had no such advantages,” she wrote in her book.

She and her brothers finally decided to open up the lemonade stand at a summer cottage in Connecticut, but faced a new dilemma: The neighborhood was so exclusive there were hardly any pedestrians. However, the business savvy siblings came up with a plan to thwart this “disadvantage” as well.

Read More: Ivanka Trump: ‘If He Wasn't My Father, I Would Spray Him With Mace’

Ivanka Trump

“As good fortune would have it, we had a bodyguard that summer,” Ivanka wrote. So, they forced the poor bodyguard (read: unwilling victim) to give them money to buy the lemonade and then turned their eyes toward their driver and the maids, who “dug deep for their spare change.” 

Ivanka gleefully retold the lesson she learned through this early business venture: They “made the best of a bad situation.”

In this regard, Ivanka is much like her father. She successfully conned working class people to fill up her own coffers and cover up the loss from her business failures.

In another one of her adventures, Ivanka recounted that she and her brothers would make fake Native American arrowheads and hide them in the parks. They would then dig their “findings” up while playing with their friends and fool them into buying the arrowheads for $5 each.

We can justify these behaviors with the same old adage, “Oh come on! She was just a kid,” but from the way Ivanka now boasts about her youthful misdemeanors, it’s clear that even after growing up, she does not understand that her actions were wrong.

It seems the Trump children learned coercion and fraud at their father’s lap. It’s no wonder they don’t believe in ethics in business.

Read More: Ivanka Trump Uses Dad’s Presidency To Sell Bracelets
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