Police Are Hoping To Capture Fugitives, Not Pokemon, With Pokemon Go

The police have now joined the ranks of Pokemon Go fans and are using it to give the slogan “gotta catch ‘em all” a whole new meaning.

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Apparently, the Pokemon Go fever has hit law enforcement agencies as well.

First, San Diego’s police department showed its support for Pokemon Go players by blasting Pokemon’s theme song from their squad cars.

Now, New Hampshire police are using the game to lure in people on the run from the law.

A post submitted on Manchester Police Department Facebook page on Sunday, invited around 500 people, calling them “the lucky ones,” to come catch a Charizard — a rare Pokemon — outside the police station.

The catch? The “lucky ones” are all fugitives the cops hoped to bait with the current gaming obsession.

None of the fugitives have, as of yet, proven themselves stupid enough to fall for the obvious trap, but the Facebook post is quite popular among social media followers.   

“LMAO Glad the police are getting some chuckles and fun out of this too!” says Dylon Curtis, a Facebook user.

“You know, it may work if it didn't direct to a ‘most wanted’ page,” Stesha Moreno said in pointing to the obvious fault in the ploy. “If it directed to just a list, or something, I can see some idiot criminals falling for it.”

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The appearances of rare Pokemon have driven huge crowds in a rampage around the world. Just a couple of days ago, the sighting of Vaporean, another less common Pokemon, caused a stampede at New York City’s Central Park.


Elsewhere around the world, the game has raised concerns about taking players to unsafe or inappropriate locations.

Just last week, a player was stabbed while playing Pokemon Go in a deserted street in the dead of the night.

The emergence of Pokemon in an area is often subject to the time of the day, environment and even high cell usage. A collective groan echoed from Pokemon Go players on July 16, when Nintendo-Niantic reported downtime after the mob of players proved too heavy for its servers.

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