Mistrust Grows As Pakistan Calls For Bin Laden Inquiry

Pakistan's main opposition party is demanding an independent inquiry into why the US did not pre-warn the country about the Osama bin Laden raid. Opposition leader Nawaz Sharif has criticised his country's spy agency and rejected the military-led inquiry, demanding an independent commission instead.

Former Pakistani president Pervez Musharraf says the raid in which Osama bin Laden was killed was a violation of Pakistan's sovereignty.

Pakistan's main opposition party is demanding an independent inquiry into why the US did not pre-warn the country about the Osama bin Laden raid.

Opposition leader Nawaz Sharif has criticised his country's spy agency and rejected the military-led inquiry, demanding an independent commission instead.

His call comes as US senator John Kerry prepares to travel to Pakistan.

Senator Kerry has close ties to the White House and wants to meet all the main players in Pakistan to discuss the strained relations.

Former Pakistani president Pervez Musharraf says the raid in which Osama bin Laden was killed was a violation of Pakistan's sovereignty and a sign of mistrust between the two partners.

He says Pakistan has cooperated with the US in many other cases and said the unilateral US action showed a lack of trust.

"What kind of friend is that, that you haven't taken us into confidence?" he said.

"In my time, we apprehended three dozen, dozens of Al Qaeda people ... we cooperated with each other, we spotted the target, we identified it.

"You can't clap with one hand. If you don't trust Pakistan, how can Pakistan trust you?"

Mr Musharraf also says there was no deal between his government and Washington almost a decade ago allowing US forces to conduct a unilateral raid in Pakistani territory, as reported by the British newspaper The Guardian.

"Never! And this is the assertion being cast by the Guardian and I rejected that. I condemn such an insinuation. There was no such deal," he said.

The Pakistan government has continued to reject allegations it was incompetent or complicit over bin Laden.

Mr Musharraf acknowledged however that Pakistani intelligence might have helped bin Laden remain undetected for years at his compound in the garrison town of Abbottabad, but said it would have been a "rogue element" in the ranks.

It was more likely that this was a big "blunder" by Pakistan in failing to detect the Al Qaeda leader for years, he said.

Mr Musharraf warned the United States will be "a loser" if it alienates Pakistan in the war against Al Qaeda and Islamic militants.

The killing 10 days ago has sparked warnings from Al Qaeda's affiliate in Yemen that a violent jihadist struggle will begin in retaliation.

ABC Online